The Other Woman

Simone-let-it-all-outIn many of her performances, Nina Simone communicated a fascinating mixture of agency and passivity, ownership and submission. A related dynamic can be found in ‘The Other Woman’, a song Simone performed throughout her career and which brings together aspects of physicality with the deceptive passivity of the torch song.  In fact, the song is only superficially torch-like. The first verses compare the physical attributes of “the other woman”, the narrator’s rival who “finds time to manicure her nails”, who “is perfect where her rival fails” and who, it initially appears, is the one favoured by the man in the song. A triangle is set up of a desirable, cheating husband, a faithful but unglamorous wife and mother painfully aware of her husband’s infidelity, and the “perfect” lover.

This scenario of an abandoned woman comparing herself to a rival and staying faithful to her man despite his betrayal would not be out of place in a torch song. The sadness of Simone’s tone and the “pathetic” piano accompaniment appear to underline an interpretation of the song as one of passivity and submission. However, there are clues, even before the song enters its second phase, that the glamorous lover, described at one point as a “lonesome queen”, does not necessarily hold the upper hand; we are told, for example, that her time with the husband is “a change from old routine”. This aspect then becomes the focus of the song as it hinges on the crucial word “but” (which Simone stretches to several beat-less seconds on most recorded performances). “Bu-uh-uh-uh-uh-uh-uh-uh-ut”, we are told, “the other woman / will always cry herself to sleep” and “will never have his love to keep”. Her ultimate destiny is to spend her life “alone”, a word given extra emphasis on the version heard on Let It All Out by being preceded with one of Simone’s (at that time) trademark “scats” and underlined by a variation of the “Wenceslas” theme that Simone regularly wove into ‘Little Girl Blue‘.

The relish given to this finale suggests a kind of revenge enacted by the song’s narrator. She may not be the “winner” (if anyone is, it is surely the husband, who escapes the song unscathed and still desired), but the element of justice and/or revenge connects the song to a tradition that has more in common with the sometimes ambiguous feminism of country music than with the submissive stance of the torch song (interestingly, country star Loretta Lynn recorded a (different) song called ‘The Other Woman‘). Common to both traditions, however, is a sense of transition from suffering, subjected lover to singing subject in control of the situation and its narrativization. If history is written by the victors, the narrative signals some sort of victory over fate, the singing of it even more so.

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